Film, Life, Phd

Isle of Dogs: a delightful escape for adults, not kids

I saw Isle of Dogs (2018) last night at the cinema with a friend, and was delighted by it! The film is written and directed by Wes Anderson. It is a stop-motion animation with some big names voicing characters, including Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin and Scarlett Johnansson. I don't want to ruin the film for anyone… Continue reading Isle of Dogs: a delightful escape for adults, not kids

Life, Phd

Starting my PhD interviews: transcription takes a long time, and Impostor Syndrome is real!

Last week I interviewed two people for my PhD research, and I will hopefully be interviewing many more people over the next year. The interviews are qualitative semi-structured interviews  (interviews focused on in-depth conversations with people, with some set questions asked to all interviewees but also allowing them to lead the conversation), which is the first time… Continue reading Starting my PhD interviews: transcription takes a long time, and Impostor Syndrome is real!

Film, Life, Phd

Passing my initial review and conference presentation

It has been a very long time since I have posted on here, sorry! This is due to a combination of having been unwell, and getting very busy at university with various projects. But this is precisely what I wanted to avoid: posting about the PhD journey is an important way of documenting the process,… Continue reading Passing my initial review and conference presentation

Life, Phd

My first conference presentation and charity fundraising

Last week was very exciting - I gave my first conference presentation! Bournemouth Uni put on the Faculty of Media and Communication Post Graduate Conference 2017 on Wednesday, showcasing the diverse research going on in the department. My short presentation was titled "More than just a (c) symbol: Understanding copyright law and how to protect… Continue reading My first conference presentation and charity fundraising

Film, Phd

Thor: Ragnarok review- putting the fun back into Marvel

Image via IMDB I went to see the latest Marvel movie, Thor: Ragnorak, yesterday and it is refreshingly different from their usual offerings. Directed by Taika Waititi and written by Eric Pearson, the film sees the return of Chris Hemsworth as Thor, supported by Mark Ruffalo, Cate Blanchett, Idris Elba and Tom Hiddleston. As other… Continue reading Thor: Ragnarok review- putting the fun back into Marvel

Phd

beginning the literature review – taking notes

Another brilliant PhD post by Pat Thomson, make sure you read it!

patter

The purpose of the literature review shapes the way that noting is done.

And the purpose is to situate your study in the field – that is, to establish a space for the work you are going to do – and to find concepts and approaches that are helpful, that you can build on. It is also important to understand key debates and differences in the field so that you can position yourself in relation to them. The literature review thus typically discusses a field of knowledge production and key concepts and lines of argument within it.

The literature review is not finished in the first year of doctoral study, and the ways in which texts are used to develop a research proposal in year one may not be the same as their use in the final thesis text when the findings and argument are known. But whether it’s early…

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Film, Phd

The Snowman film review: a snow storm in a teacup

Image via IMDB The Snowman is a Nordic-noir thriller based on the bestseller by Jo Nesbø, adapted by screenwriters Peter Straughan and Hossein Amini and directed by Tomas Alfredson. The film is set in Norway, in Oslo, Bergen and Geilo. There are absolutely beautiful shots of the Oslo-Bergen railway throughout the film, as well as… Continue reading The Snowman film review: a snow storm in a teacup

Life, Phd

The first month of the PhD: beginning to climb the mountain

So it's been almost a month since I first started university as a PhD student. It's been an incredibly busy month (by choice), with very few evenings spent at home doing nothing. I've found that there are an incredible amount of interesting events and opportunities to be involved in, if you want to. I've signed up… Continue reading The first month of the PhD: beginning to climb the mountain

Phd

Culture vs. Copyright: A Diary of a Naive Philosopher, Book Review

A very interesting read about copyright law and the creative industries!

Rhythm Prism Publishing

By Anatoly Volynets

 The_Stationers'_Company_Mark
This was the mark of the Stationer’s Company,
which had a monopoly on printing rights in England from
1557 to 1710.  The image is in the public domain.
……………………………………………………

Innovators often have a hard time convincing people to change the way things “have always been done”. History offers startling examples of how tightly people hold onto entrenched views. In the 1950’s, for example, early models of the kidney dialysis machine were considered “abominations” by some doctors at Mt. Sinai Hospital. And in the nineteenth century, Ignaz Semmelweiss was derided by medical colleagues for suggesting doctors should wash their hands before assisting at childbirth. So prepare yourself to resist the notions of Anatoly Volynets when you read his book, Culture vs. Copyright. In the book, Mr. Volynets suggests that artists, and the public, would benefit if copyright laws were eliminated.

Many readers may feel this discussion…

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